Meta is Murder
This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.
"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.
The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.
It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.
This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.
"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.
The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.
It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.
This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.
"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.
The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.
It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.
This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.
"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.
The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.
It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.
This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.
"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.
The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.
It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.
This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.
"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.
The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.
It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.
This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.
"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.
The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.
It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.
This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.
"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.
The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.
It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.
This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.
"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.
The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.
It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.

This is one of my favorite pieces of writing, an almost-unbelievable instance of enabling limits I’ve discussed before: Christian Bök’s Eunoia, which you can see in its entirety here.

"Eunoia" is the shortest word in English containing all five vowels, and means “well mind” or “beautiful thinking”; it is also a medical term for normal mental health, and is, accordingly, infrequently used.

The work of that title is an exercise in extreme constrained writing (univocalics, specifically): Bök uses only one vowel per chapter, and each chapter must contain a specified set of scenes: an orgy, something at sea, a meal, etc.

It must be read to be believed; I think it’s very beautiful and have posted about it on occasion; Jack July, it should be said, is less of a fan of Bök’s. Above: the paragraphs from “I.” I hope you enjoy it.

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Notes

  1. tryingtosay reblogged this from mills
  2. a-flower-child reblogged this from mills
  3. allincircles reblogged this from mills
  4. ferfluffle reblogged this from spaceships and added:
    wow, cool.
  5. dhk reblogged this from spaceships and added:
    To read later - we already see Yiddish, so thank you cultural harbinger to the stars mister Mills.
  6. spaceships reblogged this from mills
  7. pegobry reblogged this from mills
  8. singulus reblogged this from mills and added:
    ’ Interesting … Thanks To:mills♥
  9. lillianz reblogged this from towitistowoo and added:
    Brain hurts a little trying to read it